Slow death by your sofa (Part 2)


 

Now, you may already know about the dangers of toxins. And you may already do everything you can to avoid them — like eating organic food, drinking filtered water, or using natural products in your home. But what you may not know is that even if you take all these precautions, your body can still be contaminated.

In one recent study, scientists tested a group of families for 107 different man-made toxins. They tested blood and urine samples from each family member. Every family member was tested including grandparents, parents and children.

Here’s what they found… Every single person from the youngest to the oldest was contaminated with toxins. And the family members with the most toxins in their bodies were between the ages of 58 and 92.

In fact, scientists discovered over 63 different chemicals in the bodies of the oldest generation! They found PCBs, organochlorine pesticides, brominated flame retardants, perfluorinated chemicals, and more.

And these aren’t the only toxins that may be lurking in your body…

A comprehensive survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control found 148 different chemicals in the blood and urine samples of 2,400 Americans. More than a quarter of all the samples contained benzo(a)pryene, a toxin found in automobile exhaust fumes. And nine out of ten samples contained a mixture of toxic pesticides.

A comprehensive survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control found 148 different chemicals in the blood and urine samples of 2,400 Americans.More than a quarter of all the samples contained benzo(a)pryene, a toxin found in automobile exhaust fumes. And nine out of ten samples contained a mixture of toxic pesticides.

National Geographic Magazine paid nearly $15,000 to test one of their reporters for the presence of 320 different chemicals as part of an undercover investigation into environmental toxins. They discovered that the reporter’s level of one flame retardant chemical was so high it would have been considered alarming, even if the reporter had worked in a plant that manufactured the chemical!

A Mount Sinai School of Medicine study found a total of 167 different chemicals in the blood and urine samples of volunteers. That’s an average of 91 toxins each. They found lead, dioxins, PCBs, phthalate DEHP, as well as compounds that have been banned for more than a quarter century. Bottom line: every single person in every study was contaminated.

So, if you’re tired all the time, this could be the reason why… 

If you suffer from joint pain and inflammation, this could be the reason why…

And if you’re plagued by “senior moments” and brain fog, this could be the reason why…

be well

Dr Sundardas D Annamalay

How Poverty Affects Behavior and Academic Performance and Financial Success


There is no shortage of theories explaining behavior differences among children. The prevailing theory among psychologists and child development specialists is that behavior stems from a combination of genes and environment. Genes begin the process: behavioral geneticists commonly claim that DNA accounts for 30–50 percent of our behaviors (Saudino, 2005), an estimate that leaves 50–70 percent explained by environment.

This tidy division of influencing factors may be somewhat misleading, however. First, the effects of the nine months a child spends in utero are far from negligible, especially on IQ (Devlin, Daniels, & Roeder, 1997). Factors such as quality of prenatal care, exposure to toxins, and stress have a strong influence on the developing child. In addition, the relatively new field of epigenetics—the study of heritable changes in gene function that occur without a change in primary DNA sequence—blurs the line between nature and nurture. Environment affects the receptors on our cells, which send messages to genes, which turn various functional switches on or off. It’s like this: like light switches, genes can be turned on or off. 

When they’re switched on, they send signals that can affect the processes or structures in individual cells. For example, lifting weights tells the genes to “turn on” the signal to build muscle tissue. Genes can be either activated or shut off by a host of other environmental factors, such as stress and nutrition. These switches can either strengthen or impair aggression, immune function, learning, and memory (Rutter, Moffitt, & Caspi, 2006).

A recent University of British Columbia and Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics (CMMT) study has revealed that childhood poverty, stress as an adult, and demographics such as age, sex and ethnicity, all leave an imprint on a person’s genes. And, that this imprint could play a role in our immune response.

The study hich was published in a special volume of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that looks at how experiences beginning before birth and in the years after can affect the course of a person’s life.

Recent evidence (Harris, 2006) suggests that the complex web of social relationships students experience—with peers, adults in the school, and family members—exerts a much greater influence on their behavior than researchers had previously assumed. This process starts with students’ core relationships with parents or primary caregivers in their lives, which form a personality that is either secure and attached or insecure and unattached. 

Securely attached children typically behave better in school (Blair et al., 2008). Once students are in school, the dual factors of socialization and social status contribute significantly to behavior. The school socialization process typically pressures students to be like their peers or risk social rejection, whereas the quest for high social status drives students to attempt to differentiate themselves in some areas—sports, personal style, sense of humor, or street skills, for example.

Socioeconomic status forms a huge part of this equation. Children raised in poverty rarely choose to behave differently, but they are faced daily with overwhelming challenges that affluent children never have to confront, and their brains have adapted to suboptimal conditions in ways that undermine good school performance. (the word EACH is a handy mnemonic): 

  • Emotional and Social Challenges.
  • Acute and Chronic Stressors.
  • Cognitive Lags.
  • Health and Safety Issues.

Combined, these factors present an extraordinary challenge to academic and social success and eventual financial success. Feel free to download my e-book called  “Discover  Your Wealth Blueprint” which looks a at the psychology of wealth creation. 

 

Image

 

 

http://drsundardas.wix.com/wealthbp