Environmental toxicity and dis-ease.


According to the Washington, D.C. based Environmental Working Group
(EWG), manufacturers dumped more than one billion pounds of toxic chemicals into rivers, lakes and other bodies of water between 1990 and 1994. EWG also estimates that
manufacturers contributed about 450 million additional pounds via sewage.

In the 1940’s, a billion pounds of synthetic chemicals were produced each year. By the 1980’s, production was up to 500 billion pounds. And 1000 new chemicals are introduced each year. Yet the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act only addresses 100 contaminants.

Of the thousands of chemicals found in the water, the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) sets safety levels for only 60. Even with only these 60 standards, the EPA reports almost 1/2 of all municipal water supplies in the U.S. annually violate Federal health standards. In recent years, serious violations have affected over 120 million people. Wells are not much better, with 2/3 of them in violation of at least one of the Safe Drinking Water Act standards. The sorry condition of water in the U.S. is reflected in the remark by President Clinton that 40% of American waterways are unfit to swim
in and in fact will not support life.

We live in a world surrounded by toxins. Every year, 2000 new chemicals will be released on the market, some not fully tested for their effect on the human body. Some are so called PBT’s or Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins, meaning they exist in the environment and our food chain for a long time. These are substances such as DDT, PCB’s, Dioxins and plasticizers. Their effects range from immuntoxicity to endocrine disruption and some may even be carcinogenic. This is compounded by the grasshopper effect, where toxins move from temperate to cold climates. Endogenous toxins are also created in the form of the end products of our metabolism, such as histamine and adrenaline. If these are not detoxified and excreted, they can be as harmful as external toxins.

With the process of industrialisation and urbanization, many time-saving and labour saving devices and innovations have been introduced. We have become a society of mass consumers. We have also developed the habit of instant gratification. Whomsoever could satisfy this need for instant results be it in the arena of food, beverages, entertainment or even medical needs stood to make a fortune. This often resulted in the indiscriminate usage of chemicals, food additives, automation, chemical fertilizers and drugs. We are experiencing the side-effects now.

According to the Washington, D.C. based Environmental Working Group
(EWG), manufacturers dumped more than one billion pounds of toxic chemicals into rivers, lakes and other bodies of water between 1990 and 1994. EWG also estimates that
manufacturers contributed about 450 million additional pounds via sewage.

In the 1940’s, a billion pounds of synthetic chemicals were produced each year. By the 1980’s, production was up to 500 billion pounds. And 1000 new chemicals are introduced each year. Yet the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act only addresses 100 contaminants.

Pesticides are another problem. Two billion pounds of pesticides are used every year. That’s eight pounds for every American. These pesticides enter water systems via disposal sites, animal waste, runoff, sewage, etc. After reviewing published (but not publicized) State data and conducting its own tests, EWG found that a single glass of
Midwestern tap water has three or more pesticides in it. In China, Taiwan and other Asian countries, the presence of chemicals and pesticides in water is reducing the fertility rates of males and females. Even though the incidence of infectious disease is down, the incidence of illness due to environmental toxicity due to water borne pollution is up.

Pesticides are another problem. Two billion pounds of pesticides are used every year. That’s eight pounds for every American. These pesticides enter water systems via disposal sites, animal waste, runoff, sewage, etc. After reviewing published (but not publicized) State data and conducting its own tests, EWG found that a single glass of
Midwestern tap water has three or more pesticides in it.

The following excerpt from Tap Water Blues, produced by the EWG and Physicians for Social Responsibility, states: “Every spring, farmers across the Corn Belt apply 150 million pounds of five herbicides–atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, alacholor and metolachlor to their corn and soybean fields. Every spring, rains wash a substantial
portion of those chemicals into the drinking water of 11.7 million people in the Midwest and Louisiana. According to this article, none of these herbicides are removed by the conventional city municipalities drinking water treatment technologies that are used by more than 90% of all water utilities in the United States.”

A deficiency of specific nutrients may allow some toxins to produce severe damage to our cells by a process of free radical oxidation as we have already discussed above. Oxidation also occurs dramatically when fats inadequately protected by anti-oxidants like Vitamins C and E become rancid. Too much cholesterol/fat in your arteries causes oxidation, damage to their lining and eventually arteriosclerosis. On the obvious level, free radical damage can take the form of poor quality skin and lack lustre hair. It can aggravate whatever skin problems you may have. It can rob you of your energy and leave you feeling lethargic, tired and yes, even depressed. Oxidising heavy metals such as lead, excessive iron or copper and cadmium produces similar damage; as do free radicals in smoke and alcohol. Cells so affected can become cancerous or part of an arthritic or any other inflammatory process. In general free-radical activity can be held responsible for any if not all forms of degenerative disorders from cancer to diabetes.
What are you doing to drink clean water, detoxify and eat clean, healthy food?

Be well

Dr Sundardas

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2 thoughts on “Environmental toxicity and dis-ease.

  1. I need to to thank you for this good read!! I definitely
    enjoyed every bit of it. I’ve got you book-marked to look at new things you post…

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